Πέμπτη, 19 Ιουλίου 2018

An Introduction to Pharmacovigilance, 2nd ed

No abstract available

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In Response

No abstract available

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Preventing Adverse Events in Cataract Surgery: Sub-Tenon’s Block

No abstract available

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Survival Analysis and Interpretation of Time-to-Event Data: The Tortoise and the Hare

Survival analysis, or more generally, time-to-event analysis, refers to a set of methods for analyzing the length of time until the occurrence of a well-defined end point of interest. A unique feature of survival data is that typically not all patients experience the event (eg, death) by the end of the observation period, so the actual survival times for some patients are unknown. This phenomenon, referred to as censoring, must be accounted for in the analysis to allow for valid inferences. Moreover, survival times are usually skewed, limiting the usefulness of analysis methods that assume a normal data distribution. As part of the ongoing series in Anesthesia & Analgesia, this tutorial reviews statistical methods for the appropriate analysis of time-to-event data, including nonparametric and semiparametric methods—specifically the Kaplan-Meier estimator, log-rank test, and Cox proportional hazards model. These methods are by far the most commonly used techniques for such data in medical literature. Illustrative examples from studies published in Anesthesia & Analgesia demonstrate how these techniques are used in practice. Full parametric models and models to deal with special circumstances, such as recurrent events models, competing risks models, and frailty models, are briefly discussed. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. Accepted for publication June 8, 2018. Funding: None. The authors declare no conflicts of interest. Reprints will not be available from the authors. Address correspondence to Patrick Schober, MD, PhD, MMedStat, Department of Anesthesiology, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Address e-mail to p.schober@vumc.nl. © 2018 International Anesthesia Research Society

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Effects of menstrual cycle phase on electrocortical response to reward and depressive symptoms in women

Psychophysiology, EarlyView.


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Alpha‐band functional connectivity during cued versus implicit modality‐specific anticipatory attention: EEG‐source coherence analysis

Psychophysiology, EarlyView.


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Family dynamics in transthyretin‐related familial amyloid polyneuropathy Val30Met: does genetic risk affect family functioning?

Clinical Genetics, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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Novel SUZ12 mutations in Weaver‐like syndrome

Clinical Genetics, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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A novel homozygous frame‐shift variant in the LHCGR gene is associated with primary ovarian insufficiency in a Pakistani family

Clinical Genetics, EarlyView.


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The power of the Mediator complex ‐ expanding the genetic architecture and phenotypic spectrum of MED12‐related disorders

Clinical Genetics, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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Physical activity effects on the individual alpha peak frequency of older adults with and without genetic risk factors for Alzheimer’s Disease: A MEG study

Publication date: September 2018

Source: Clinical Neurophysiology, Volume 129, Issue 9

Author(s): Jaisalmer de Frutos-Lucas, David López-Sanz, Pilar Zuluaga, Inmaculada Concepcion Rodríguez-Rojo, Raúl Luna, María Eugenia López, María Luisa Delgado-Losada, Alberto Marcos, Ana Barabash, Ramón López-Higes, Fernando Maestú, Alberto Fernández

Abstract
Objective

Since a cure for Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is yet to be discovered, attention has shifted towards prevention. Physical activity (PA) emerged as a notorious lifestyle factor that could influence brain structure and function. The individual alpha peak frequency (IAPF) is a measure that summarizes the spectral content of brain signals and has been proven to be sensitive to both AD pathology and PA interventions. Therefore, our goal was to unravel whether chronic PA modulates IAPF and if APOE ɛ4 carriage moderates this relationship.

Methods

We analyzed 4-minutes of resting-state magnetoencephalographic recordings from 100 healthy elders that provided self-reported measures of PA, and the IAPF was calculated.

Results

We found that IAPF was negatively influenced by age and APOE and positively influenced by PA. The effect of PA on IAPF only remained significant for the ɛ4 non-carriers group.

Conclusions

PA is positively associated to higher IAPF in healthy older adults and could potentially act as a protective factor against cognitive decline. Nevertheless, such effect is non-significant among elders who are more vulnerable to developing AD due to their genetic carriage.

Significance

This investigation offers the first neurophysiological evidences on the combined effects of APOE genotype and PA in healthy elders.



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PhoPepMass: A database and search tool assisting human phosphorylation peptide identification from mass spectrometry data

Publication date: Available online 19 July 2018

Source: Journal of Genetics and Genomics

Author(s): Menghuan Zhang, Hui Cui, Lanming Chen, Ying Yu, Michael O. Glocker, Lu Xie

Abstract

Protein phosphorylation, one of the most important protein post-translational modifications, is involved in various biological processes, and the identification of phosphorylation peptides (phosphopeptides) and their corresponding phosphorylation sites (phosphosites) will facilitate the understanding of the molecular mechanism and function of phosphorylation. Mass spectrometry (MS) provides a high-throughput technology that enables the identification of large numbers of phosphosites. PhoPepMass is designed to assist human phosphopeptide identification from MS data based on a specific database of phophopeptide masses and a multivariate hypergeometric matching algorithm. It contains 244,915 phosphosites from several public sources. Moreover, the accurate masses of peptides and fragments with phosphosites were calculated. It is the first database that provides a systematic resource for the query of phosphosites on peptides and their corresponding masses. This allows researchers to search certain proteins of which phosphosites have been reported, to browse detailed phosphopeptide and fragment information, to match masses from MS analyses with defined threshold to the corresponding phosphopeptide, and to compare proprietary phosphopeptide discovery results with results from previous studies. Additionally, a database search software is created and a "two-stage search strategy" is suggested to identify phosphopeptides from tandem mass spectra of proteomics data. We expect PhoPepMass to be a useful tool and a source of reference for proteomics researchers. PhoPepMass is available at https://www.scbit.org/phopepmass/index.html.



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Eccentric exercise increases circulating fibroblast activation protein α but not bioactive fibroblast growth factor 21 in healthy humans

Experimental Physiology, Page 876-883, July 2018.


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Do we have to consider acidosis induced by exercise as deleterious in sickle cell disease?

Experimental Physiology, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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Nicotinamide riboside supplementation dysregulates redox and energy metabolism in rats: Implications for exercise performance

Experimental Physiology, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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Validation of a purpose‐built chewing gum and smartphone application to evaluate chewing efficiency

Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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Experimental noxious stimulation of the right masseter muscle does not affect bilateral masseter and temporalis muscle activity and force parameters during standardized isometric biting tasks

Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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Parkinson disease, temporomandibular disorders, and bruxism: a pilot study

Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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The efficacy of dextrose prolotherapy over placebo for temporomandibular joint hypermobility: a systematic review and meta‐analysis

Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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Relationship between gerotranscendence and oral health‐related quality of life

Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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Autonomic responses to tooth clenching in migraineurs ‐ augmented trigeminocardiac reflex?

Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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Complications and survival rates of inlays and onlays vs. complete coverage restorations: A systematic review and analysis of studies

Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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Masticatory muscle stretching for the management of sleep bruxism: a randomized controlled trial

Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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Temporomandibular Disorder symptoms and their association with quality of life, emotional states and sleep quality in Southeast Asian youths

Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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Abnormal folate metabolism causes age‐, sex‐, and parent‐of‐origin specific haematological defects in mice

The Journal of Physiology, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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Modelling the details: integrating structure with function

The Journal of Physiology, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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Angiogenesis in the lung

The Journal of Physiology, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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Neural memory of the genioglossus muscle during sleep is stage‐dependent in healthy subjects and obstructive sleep apnea patients

The Journal of Physiology, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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Sex‐specific density of ventricular SK currents: is this a general feature of SK channel function?

The Journal of Physiology, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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Sympathoexcitation by hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons projecting to the rostral ventrolateral medulla

The Journal of Physiology, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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GABA beyond the synapse‐defining the subtype‐specific pharmacodynamics of nonsynaptic GABAA receptors

The Journal of Physiology, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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Novel mechanisms regulating endothelial barrier function in the pulmonary microcirculation

The Journal of Physiology, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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CrossTalk proposal: mucosal acidification drives early progressive lung disease in cystic fibrosis

The Journal of Physiology, EarlyView.


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CrossTalk opposing view: mucosal acidification does not drive early progressive lung disease in cystic fibrosis

The Journal of Physiology, EarlyView.


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Rebuttal from Stephen M. Stick and André Schultz

The Journal of Physiology, EarlyView.


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Rebuttal from Miriam F. Figueira, Megan J. Webster and Robert Tarran

The Journal of Physiology, EarlyView.


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ERG3 potassium channel‐mediated suppression of neuronal intrinsic excitability and prevention of seizure generation in mice

The Journal of Physiology, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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The impact of exercise and nutrition in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass

The Journal of Physiology, Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.


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Physiology and molecular biology of barrier mechanisms in the fetal and neonatal brain

The Journal of Physiology, EarlyView.


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Pre‐ and early postnatal nicotine exposure exacerbates autoresuscitation failure in serotonin‐deficient rat neonates

The Journal of Physiology, EarlyView.


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Overview: neuroplasticity and synaptic function in neuropsychiatric disorders

The Journal of Physiology, Volume 596, Issue 14, Page 2745-2746, 15 July 2018.


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Issue Information

The Journal of Physiology, Volume 596, Issue 14, Page 2631-2632, 15 July 2018.


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Mechanisms underlying the role of DISC1 in synaptic plasticity

The Journal of Physiology, Volume 596, Issue 14, Page 2747-2771, 15 July 2018.


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Gordon Research Conference on Ca2+ Signalling 2017 Editorial

The Journal of Physiology, Volume 596, Issue 14, Page 2661-2662, 15 July 2018.


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Effects of remifentanil maintenance during recovery on emergence delirium in children with sevoflurane anesthesia

Pediatric Anesthesia, EarlyView.


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Delivery of sevoflurane using a neonatal ventilator

Pediatric Anesthesia, EarlyView.


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Work of breathing for cuffed and uncuffed pediatric endotracheal tubes in an in vitro lung model setting

Pediatric Anesthesia, EarlyView.


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A decompensated cryptogenic cirrhosis? No, a late liver histiocytosis!



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Lumbar Stability in Healthy Individuals and Low Back Pain Patients Quantified by Wall Plank-and-Roll Test

Low back pain has been linked to the degree of lumbar stability, but evaluating lumbar stability has remained a challenge. A previous research has shown that inertial sensors could be used to quantify motor patterns during the wall plank-and-roll (WPR) test, and that low back pain may cause deviations in movement from the general motor patterns observed in healthy subjects.

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Test-retest reliability of dynamic balance performance-based measures among adults with a unilateral lower-limb amputation

There is large variation in administration of performance-based, dynamic balance measures among adults with lower-limb amputation (LLA). Further, there has been limited exploration of test-retest reliability of these measures in adults with lower-limb loss, including whether there is a difference in reliability if one records 'best' versus 'average' performance across trials.

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Regenerative Sports Medicine: Past, Present and Future



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Female office workers with moderate neck pain have increased anterior positioning of the cervical spine and stiffness of upper trapezius myofascial tissue in sitting posture

Work related neck disorders (WRNDs) are among the most common dysfunctions in office workers. Understanding cervical myofascial mechanical characteristics that differentiate symptomatic and asymptomatic office workers is crucial for the understanding of musculoskeletal dysfunctions in workers with neck pain.

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A decompensated cryptogenic cirrhosis? No, a late liver histiocytosis!



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Pursed Lip Breathing Exercise to Reduce Shortness of Breath

Publication date: Available online 19 July 2018

Source: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Author(s): Archana Vatwani



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P66. Long term follow-up in bilateral deep brain stimulation of VIM in MS-related tremor

Tremor in Multiple Sclerosis is an important cause for disability. As medical treatment often does not provide a sufficient reduction of tremor amplitude, deep brain stimulation is an important option in these patients. Because in previous studies often unilateral stimulation of the VIM was performed, the aim of our retrospective analysis was to evaluate the effect of bilateral stimulation on tremor amplitude, activities of daily living, and due to an additional effect on axial tremor, improvement of global disability (EDSS) and mobility.

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Paramedic - ARA Diagnostic Imaging

ARA Diagnostic Imaging is seeking an experienced Paramedic to join our growing team! \*\* $2,500 SIGN ON BONUS for external applicants. Summary: Following Clinical Operating Guidelines, responsible for providing quality patient medical care and performing all duties in a safe and professional manner to ensure the safety of all patients, customers and employees.

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Association Between Maternal 2nd Trimester Plasma Folate Levels and Infant Bronchiolitis

Abstract

Objectives Viral bronchiolitis is the most common cause of infant hospitalization. Folic acid supplementation is important during the periconceptional period to prevent neural tube defects. An area of investigation is whether higher prenatal folate is a risk factor for childhood respiratory illnesses. We investigated the association between maternal 2nd trimester plasma folate levels and infant bronchiolitis. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis in a subset of mother-infant dyads (n = 676) enrolled in the Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood study and Tennessee Medicaid. Maternal folate status was determined using 2nd trimester (16–28 weeks) plasma samples. Bronchiolitis diagnosis in the first year of life was ascertained using International Classification of Diagnosis-9 codes from Medicaid administrative data. We used multivariable logistic regression to assess the adjusted association of prenatal folate levels and infant bronchiolitis outcome. Results Half of the women in this lower-income and predominately African-American (84%) study population had high levels of folate (median 2nd trimester level 19.2 ng/mL) and 21% of infants had at least one bronchiolitis healthcare visit. A relationship initially positive then reversing between maternal plasma folate and infant bronchiolitis was observed that did not reach statistical significance (poverall = .112, pnonlinear effect = .088). Additional adjustment for dietary methyl donor intake did not significantly alter the association. Conclusions for Practice Results did not confirm a statistically significant association between maternal 2nd trimester plasma folate levels and infant bronchiolitis. Further work is needed to investigate the role of folate, particularly higher levels, in association with early childhood respiratory illnesses.



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Hypotension after induction of general anesthesia: occurrence, risk factors, and therapy. A prospective multicentre observational study

Abstract

Background

Hypotension after induction of general anesthesia (GAIH) is common in anesthesiology practice and can impact outcomes.

Methods

In this prospective multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study, the hypotension was defined as a decrease in mean arterial pressure of > 30% compared to the first measurement in the operation theatre before general anesthesia (GA) induction. Blood pressure was measured immediately at the time of endotracheal intubation (TETI), at five (T5) and 10 (T10) minutes after. All subjects aged > 18 years undergoing elective non-cardiac surgery under GA were included. The goals were description of GAIH occurrence, the association of GAIH with selected comorbidities, chronic medications, and anesthetics with GAIH, and the type and efficacy of interventions used to correct hypotension.

Results

Data from 661 subjects, whose GA was induced with propofol and sufentanil, were analyzed. In 36.5% of subjects, GAIH was observed at ≥ 1 of the assessed time points. GAIH was present in 2.9% subjects at all time points. The probability of GAIH is raising with age, degree of hypertension at time of arrival to theatre and presence of diabetes. The type of volatile anesthetic was not associated with the occurrence of GAIH. The overall efficiency of interventions to correct hypotension was 94.4%. Bolus fluids were the most often used intervention and was 96.4% effective.

Conclusion

GAIH rate depends on age, degree of blood pressure decompensation prior the surgery, and presence of diabetes mellitus type II.



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Alpha emitter NORM crystal scales in industrial pipelines: A study case

Publication date: December 2018

Source: Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, Volume 192

Author(s): H. Barros, M. Diaz-Lagos, S.A. Martinez-Ovalle, L. Sajo-Bohus, J.L. Estupiñan

Abstract

Radioactive related pollution due to suspended particulate matter dispersion is an important workplace and health care issue. Recycling oil production ducts and contaminated production equipment, represent a health hazard to workers and public alike. Radioactive plate-out NORM scales with crystal deposit is analyzed by different techniques; results provide proper information on physico-chemical features and emitted alpha particles. Recommendations for handling and recycling procedures are included in relation to health risk and radiological hazard.

Graphical abstract

Image 1



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The evidence for fungus in Crohn’s disease pathogenesis

Abstract

Current evidence suggests the etiology of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) involves the confluence of host genetic, environmental, and microbial factors that lead to chronic, and often refractory, disease in susceptible individuals. The involvement of microbial triggers in IBD, including Crohn's disease (CD), is increasingly evident with supporting data provided with advancements in metagenomic sequencing that have identified perturbations in microbial structure and function—broadly termed dysbiosis—in CD patients compared with healthy subjects. This concept is supported by the finding germ-free animals with CD genetic susceptibility fail to develop disease; demonstrating microorganisms are necessary but not sufficient for CD. The vast majority of CD microbiome research has focused on the complex bacterial communities and microbiome dysbiosis in the gut with 16S metagenomic sequencing. However, emerging data capturing eukaryotes suggest fungal opportunistic pathogens are also associated with IBD pathogenesis and chronicity. This hypothesis is further supported by historical observations that CD patient populations display elevated antibodies against fungal targets, even evident before disease diagnosis. This review discusses the current findings in the field, followed by historical and metagenomic evidence for fungal pathogens in the development and recurrence of CD in adult and pediatric populations.



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Impact of the addition of bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, or irinotecan to fluoropyrimidin in the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer in elderly patients

International Journal of Colorectal Disease

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Late assessment of quality of life in patients with rectal carcinoma: Comparison between sphincter preservation and definitive colostomy

International Journal of Colorectal Disease

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Association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and subclinical atherosclerosis: A cross-sectional study on population over 40 years old

BMC Cardiovascular Disorders

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Diabetes is associated with advanced fibrosis and fibrosis progression in non-genotype 3 chronic hepatitis C patients

Digestive and Liver Diseases

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No difference in ghrelin-producing cell expression in obese vs non-obese stomach: A prospective histopathological case-control study

Obesity Surgery

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Noninvasive prediction of portal pressure with MR elastography and DCE-MRI of the liver and spleen: Preliminary results

Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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StatPearls

StatPearls

Book. 2018 01

Authors:

Abstract
Basic airway management in both the pediatric and adult populations includes assessing and managing airway patency, oxygen delivery, and ventilation. All efforts should be taken to maintain a patient's airway via non-invasive methodology unless indications for invasive airway management are apparent. Non-invasive airway supplementation includes passive oxygenation (nasal cannula, non-rebreather, among others), bag-valve-mask (BVM), non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (BVM with positive-pressure valve, CPAP, BIPAP), and supraglottic airways (King Tube, LMA. among others). Invasive airway management involves establishing a secure airway and placing patients on a ventilator via intubation (nasal or endotracheal), needle jet ventilation (in pediatric patients younger than 8 years old, cricothyroidotomy in pediatric patients older than 8 years old, and adults), and tracheostomy. Proper airway management begins by looking at the patient visually for trauma, obesity, cervical collar, macroglossia, among other factors to determine the type of airway approach best suited for each patient. Most important is positioning via the head tilt-chin lift maneuver, which involves extending the patient's neck by putting one hand on the forehead and the other hand on the neck to allow for the extension of the head in relation to the neck. This maneuver puts the patient into sniffing position, with the nose pointed upward and forward. Then a chin lift can be performed by taking the hand from underneath the neck to underneath the chin (mandible) and lifting the mandible until the teeth barely touch. Another airway positioning method involves the jaw thrust maneuver, which is safer in potential cervical spinal cord injury patients. This method involves maintaining the spine in a neutral position and grabbing the sides of the angle of the mandible and lifting it forward to lift the jaw and open the airway. There are some differences between the pediatric and adult populations. For example, the large occiput of the pre-pubescent pediatric patient can lead to too much flexion of the neck and can cause tracheal obstruction. This is addressed by utilizing the head tilt-chin lift maneuver, but care must be taken to avoid overextension in the pediatric population as it can cause airway obstruction due to a weak trachea in the pediatric patient. However, the head tilt-chin lift may not be adequate to maintain a patent airway, and the jaw thrust maneuver may need to be employed to prevent the pediatric, large, floppy tongue from obstructing the airway. Once properly positioned, the rescuer has the best shot at delivering effective breaths either via mouth to mouth or BVM. If there is continued difficulty at delivering breaths, then airway adjuncts like an oral pharyngeal airway (OPA) device or nasopharyngeal airway (NPA) can be useful for maintaining a patent airway to allow delivery of breaths in an unresponsive patient. NPA devices can be useful at maintaining the airway in an awake patient as well, which is beneficial if intubation is not the goal, intubation needs to be delayed, or an awake intubation is necessary. NPA devices are plastic hollow or soft rubber tubes that a healthcare provider can utilize to help with patient oxygenation and ventilation when the patient is difficult to oxygenate or ventilate via BVM, for example. NPAs are passed into the nose and pass through to the posterior pharynx. NPAs do not cause patients to gag and are, therefore, the best airway adjunct route in an awake patient and the better choice in a semiconscious patient that may not tolerate an OPA due to the gag reflex. NPAs are also helpful when a patient's mouth is difficult to open, for example, if there are angioedema, trismus, or other factors. While NPAs are airway adjuncts for difficult patient ventilation and oxygenation, they only act as a bridge to either an eventually stabilized patient that is breathing without aid or a patient that requires a secure airway via endotracheal or nasotracheal (NT) intubation. The NT route for intubation was the preferred route among critical care and emergency physicians up until several decades ago. However, today, the majority of clinicians prefer the endotracheal route for intubation as it has been shown to have better results and fewer complications. Some of the complications of NT intubation include sinusitis, nasal structure destruction due to localized pressure and decreased perfusion of nasal cartilage, and local abscesses. Furthermore, NT intubation requires narrow tubes making pulmonary toilet very difficult due to the increased airway resistance. However, there are clear advantages to NT intubation. NT intubation can be performed in the sitting position, which is valuable, especially in the pre-hospital setting when needing to intubate a patient in acutely decompensated heart failure that cannot lay flat. Other advantages include the patient's inability to bite or manipulate the tube, better patient tolerance, decrease salivation, and better access to patient oral care. In addition, the NT tube is much more stable as it has the entire nasal tract holding it in place versus the endotracheal tube that flops out the mouth and can easily dislodge or become right mainstemmed. NT intubation can be performed blind or with a flexible bronchoscope. Blind NT intubation is difficult and requires expertise and skill. However, when indicated, can be a very useful skill both in the prehospital and hospital setting. Blind NT intubation decreases the need for neck movement and mouth opening, but can only be done in the awake and ventilating patient. NT intubation via a flexible bronchoscope also requires lots of expertise and skill, and it is useless if there is blood, vomitus, or fluid that will obscure the bronchoscopes camera.


PMID: 30020592



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Role of Diagnostic Preoperative Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Radiologically Confirmed Gastric Volvulus

Abstract

Background and Aims

Gastric volvulus (GV) is a life-threatening condition that warrants prompt diagnosis and treatment. GV is a radiologic diagnosis. The role of preoperative upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE) for individuals with radiologically confirmed GV is poorly defined. Our objective was to assess the diagnostic yield of UGIE in the preoperative evaluation of patients presenting with radiologically confirmed GV.

Methods

Retrospective review of all adult patients undergoing surgery for GV between July 1996 and August 2016 has been carried out. We performed analyses evaluating diagnostic yield of preoperative UGIE and compared outcomes in patients who did and did not undergo preoperative UGIE. Outcomes were diagnostic yield of preoperative UGIE, length of hospital stay, postoperative complications, and mortality at 30 days and 1 year.

Results

In the preoperative UGIE group, the diagnostic yield was 34.6% (27/78). The most common endoscopic findings were erosive esophagitis (13/27) and clean based gastric or duodenal ulcers (5/27). There were no cases of esophago-gastric malignancy. Three patients had ulcers with stigmata of recent bleeding, and three patients had features suggestive of gastric ischemia. Endoscopic findings did not influence surgical management. There was no statistically significant difference in mortality between patients who did and did not undergo preoperative UGIE, both at 30 days (0 vs. 2.5%) and 1 year (3.8 vs. 7.5%).

Conclusion

Among patients with radiologically confirmed GV, preoperative UGIE rarely demonstrates clinically significant findings and can potentially delay definitive surgical intervention.



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MCENet: a database for maize conditional co-expression network and network characterization collaborated with multi-dimensional omics levels

Publication date: Available online 18 July 2018

Source: Journal of Genetics and Genomics

Author(s): Tian Tian, Qi You, Hengyu Yan, Wenying Xu, Zhen Su

Abstract

Maize (Zea mays) is the most widely grown grain crop in the world, playing important roles in agriculture and industry. However, the functions of maize genes remain largely unknown. High-quality genome-wide transcriptome datasets provide important biological knowledge which has been widely and successfully used in plants not only by measuring gene expression levels but also by enabling co-expression analysis for predicting gene functions and modules related to agronomic traits. Recently, thousands of maize transcriptomic data are available across different inbred lines, development stages, tissues, and treatments, or even across different tissue sections and cell lines. Here, we integrated 701 transcriptomic and 108 epigenomic data and studied the different conditional networks with multi-dimensional omics levels. We constructed a searchable, integrative, one-stop online platform, the maize conditional co-expression network (MCENet). Besides 10 global/conditional co-expression networks, MCENet provides five network accessional analysis toolkits (i.e., Network Search, Network Remodel, Module Finder, Network Comparison, and Dynamic Expression View) and multiple network functional support toolkits (e.g., motif and module enrichment analysis). We hope that our database might help plant research communities to identify maize functional genes or modules that regulate important agronomic traits. MCENet is publicly accessible at http://bioinformatics.cau.edu.cn/MCENet/.



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IRESfinder: Identifying RNA internal ribosome entry site in eukaryotic cell using framed k-mer features

Publication date: Available online 18 July 2018

Source: Journal of Genetics and Genomics

Author(s): Jian Zhao, Jing Wu, Tianyi Xu, Qichang Yang, Junhao He, Xiaofeng Song



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Correction to: Effects of Intrahippocampal Injections of Melipramin on EEG, Brain Self-Stimulation, and Behavioral Indices of Rats under Conditions of Neurogenic Stress

There are mistakes in the designations for Fig. 1 (the order of indications of the EEG ranges above the columns should be changed from α, β, and θ to α, θ, and β) and in Fig. 7 (an asterisk above the third column in panel F should be moved to the second column).



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Ethical Responsibilities of the Authors



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