Δευτέρα, 31 Οκτωβρίου 2016

Complete response to post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder by surgical resection and rituximab after living-donor liver re-transplantation for recurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis

Abstract

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a life-threatening complication of solid organ transplantation. We herein report a case of PTLD after living-donor liver re-transplantation (reLDLT) for recurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), for which complete response was achieved by surgical resection and rituximab. A 47-year-old man, who had undergone living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) twice at age of 43 and 45 years for end-stage liver disease firstly for PSC and secondary for recurrent PSC, suffered liver dysfunction due to an acute cellular rejection (ACR) 17 months after reLDLT. At reLDLT, a right liver lobe was donated from his spouse. Although steroid was effective for ACR, PTLD developed in the ileocecal area. The patient received rituximab for treatment of PTLD, and ileocecal resection for hemorrhage from ileocecal PTLD. The patient achieved complete response by rituximab and surgical resection for PTLD, but PSC recurred and hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) developed with hyperbilirubinemia and elevated serum ferritin. The patient received steroid treatment for HPS, but thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy developed presumably due to thrombotic microangiopathy. Therefore, tacrolimus was switched to mycophenolate mofetil. Despite intensive treatment including plasmapheresis and platelet infusion, fungal infection of both lungs developed, and the patient died 22 months after reLDLT. Autopsy revealed complete response of PTLD, recurrence of PSC and persistance of HPS.



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Reply from Pei-Chi Yang, Jonathan D. Moreno, Mao-Tsuen Jeng, Xander H. T. Wehrens, Sergei Noskov and Colleen E. Clancy



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Issue Information



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Questioning flecainide's mechanism of action in the treatment of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia



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Bile as a key aetiological factor of acute but not chronic pancreatitis: a possible theory revealed



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Aberrant reflex mechanisms contributing to reno-vascular hypertension: a pain in the neck?



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Mitochondrial-derived vesicles: a new player in cardiac mitochondrial quality control



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On the molecular mechanism of renal salt excretion modulation by extracellular potassium



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Assessing the Gene Content of the Megagenome: Sugar Pine (Pinus lambertiana)

Sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana Douglas) is within the subgenus Strobus with an estimated genome size of 31 Gbp. Transcriptomic resources are of particular interest in conifers due to the challenges presented in their megagenomes for gene identification. In this study, we present the first comprehensive survey of the P. lambertiana transcriptome through deep sequencing of a variety of tissue types to generate more than 2.5 billion short reads. Third generation, long reads generated through PacBio Iso-Seq has been included for the first time in conifers to combat the challenges associated with de novo transcriptome assembly. A technology comparison is provided here contribute to the otherwise scarce comparisons of 2nd and 3rd generation transcriptome sequencing approaches in plant species. In addition, the transcriptome reference was essential for gene model identification and quality assessment in the parallel project responsible for sequencing and assembly of the entire genome. In this study, the transcriptomic data was also used to address some of the questions surrounding lineage-specific Dicer-like proteins in conifers. These proteins play a role in the control of transposable element proliferation and the related genome expansion in conifers.



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Immunity, atherogenesis and vascular function



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Botulinum Toxin for Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome: A Case Report With 14 Month Follow-Up

imageAbstract: Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) presents a unique therapeutic challenge. Fasciotomy, currently the most well accepted treatment approach, still has a significant number of treatment failures, demonstrating the need for additional options. Botulinum toxin has been introduced as a potential therapeutic agent, but long-term outcomes are unknown. We present the longest documented follow-up (14 months) of a CECS case treated with botulinum toxin injections. At 14 months follow-up, the patient reported continued pain relief and had resumed her active lifestyle without any adverse effects. Although more research is needed to optimize patient selection and treatment protocol, this case illustrates the potential for botulinum toxin as a long duration, low risk alternative treatment option for CECS.

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Aerial low-frequency hearing in captive and free-ranging harbour seals ( Phoca vitulina ) measured using auditory brainstem responses

Abstract

The hearing sensitivity of 18 free-ranging and 10 captive harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) to aerial sounds was measured in the presence of typical environmental noise through auditory brainstem response measurements. A focus was put on the comparative hearing sensitivity at low frequencies. Low- and mid-frequency thresholds appeared to be elevated in both captive and free-ranging seals, but this is likely due to masking effects and limitations of the methodology used. The data also showed individual variability in hearing sensitivity with probable age-related hearing loss found in two old harbour seals. These results suggest that the acoustic sensitivity of free-ranging animals was not negatively affected by the soundscape they experienced in the wild.



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Hereditary fructose intolerance mimicking a biochemical phenotype of mucolipidosis: A review of the literature of secondary causes of lysosomal enzyme activity elevation in serum

We describe a patient with failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, liver dysfunction, and elevation of multiple plasma lysosomal enzyme activities mimicking mucolipidosis II or III, in whom a diagnosis of hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) was ultimately obtained. She presented before introduction of solid foods, given her consumption of a fructose-containing infant formula. We present the most extensive panel of lysosomal enzyme activities reported to date in a patient with HFI, and propose that multiple enzyme elevations in plasma, especially when in conjunction with a normal plasma α-mannosidase activity, should elicit a differential diagnosis of HFI. We also performed a review of the literature on the different etiologies of elevated lysosomal enzyme activities in serum or plasma. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.



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Paramedic - 161501 - Hennepin County Medical Center

The Paramedic position is responsible for responding to requests for emergency medical services and for providing Basic and Advanced Life Support to sick and injured persons at emergency scenes and during transport to a health care facility. We are currently hiring for multiple full-time openings. Schedule will be day/eve/night including rotating weekends and holidays based on department needs. This ...

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How I got through a well-being check

"Haven't seen him in a week," said the man who called us to his home.

Like a lot of folks in the industrial city of Providence, Rhode Island he lived on the second floor of the three level home, rented the first floor to his mom, and the third to whoever answered the ad he posted and seemed decent enough.

"Is that unusual?" I asked.

"He stays to himself mostly, but there's usually some sign of life up there, footsteps, a TV, doors closing, you know."

Yeah, I know. Wish I didn't. I wish I had some Vicks to rub under my nose.

"How old is he?"

"Not too old, 50 maybe," said the man.

Fifty. Not too old. Ha ha. My own 50 years seemed to take a lifetime to reach.

We entered the rear hallway. The stairs led straight up to a landing and a door. There was a shamrock decal stuck there and greasy fingerprints around the doorknob.

"Is that smell normal," I asked the landlord who had followed us?

"He's not the cleanest tenant, but this is bad."

"Yeah, it is."

The landlord opened the door and the smell got worse. A clean stove — not because the tenant was a neatnik, rather it was seldom used. Some empty cans of canned spaghetti and balls of whatever they called meat were on a folding card table that served as his dinette. Dirty dishes spilled out of the sink and onto the counter.

The refrigerator stood in the corner inviting me to open it up. Nothing in there, not even a beer.

"Hello, anybody home?" I shouted, knowing the only answer would be my echo.

He was home alright. I could smell him.

I followed the trail to three doors in a rear hallway. Door number one, door number two or door number three. One of the doors had a string of neckties tied together, starting at the door handle and going over the top.

"Rescue 1 to Fire Alarm, start the police to this address."

"Roger Rescue 1, nature?"

"Possible suicide."

I pushed the middle door. It gave a little but would not open. So I pushed a little harder.

"Here he is."

It was now a crime scene, but I needed to confirm that the man was gone. I got the door open about a foot, squeezed through and watched a dead man's weight force the door shut. He had tied the last of the neckties around his neck, strung the rest over the top of the door, tied the last to the opposite side doorknob, kneeled in front of the door, inside his bedroom, facing the back of the door and closed it.

Slowly?

Quickly?

Did he slam the door?

Did he lean into it?

I couldn't figure out the mechanics of it and realized I was spending way too much time thinking about it. Everything inside him had let go. He was bloated, stiff and dead.

Pictures of a woman and some kids had been pinned to the back of the door. I squeezed back through the doorway, pushing the body with the door.

Thankfully you can look at pictures, but they can't look back.

"Does he have any friends or family?"

"He's lived here for a year, since he got out of prison. Nobody visits that I've seen."

Nobody.

The man at the end of the ties was a lot like the homeless ex-con that had been in the ambulance a few hours before we responded to this home. He was intoxicated, but able to talk. His main concern was finding work. He had no address, no references, no money and no past to put on an application. He had been staying at a shelter, waiting for a break. He seemed like a nice enough guy so I told him about a place my brother, a correctional officer told me about, a place that gave ex-cons a chance.

It is difficult to not judge the people that we meet during our shift. As years in EMS add up, and similar experiences begin to appear the same and the people who make up those experiences say the same things, have the same complaints and even look the same, our empathy can fade. For some EMS providers it takes years while others lose it rather quickly. Then there are those who keep it together for their entire career.

Instead of dwelling on the man who gave up, I was able to focus on the one who looked like a living version of the dead guy, who now had a business name for an apartment and an address in his top pocket. I didn't know it when I handed the note to him, but the look of gratitude on his face would get me through a difficult call, and the rest of the shift.



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What role do point-of-care devices have in firefighter rehab?

This article first appeared on FireRehab.com, sponsored by Masimo.

By Jay MacNeal with Todd Daniello, Ken Hanson, Mitch Li, Sean Marquis, John Pakiela, Matt Smetana and Chris Wistrom

The ability to rapidly and reliably perform laboratory testing at the patient bedside has taken huge leaps in recent years. There are devices to quickly check a patient's blood sugar, electrolytes, INR, cardiac enzymes, lactic acid and other biomarkers.

Do these devices have a role in the rehab area, or are they only suited for in-hospital care" Glucometers, pulse oximetry, end-tidal carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide (CO) oximetry are all common in EMS, but the use of i-STAT or other point-of-care testing devices is a bit outside the norm of most EMS operations.

To examine the appropriateness of these point-of-care testing options, we must consider the costs and human resources it will require to maintain the processing device, sampling equipment and replacement cartridges, perform calibration and training, obtain CLIA waivers, apply interpretation of the results to immediate patient care and other challenges important to EMS.

With all of that in mind, let's explore some available point-of-care testing tools and their potential usefulness or application for on-scene rehab of firefighters and other emergency personnel.

ECG and 12-lead EKG
Probably the least frequently used point-of-care test in the rehab environment is the one that has been around the longest. An EKG is an excellent tool in analysis of the person with chest pain or persistent shortness of breath, but it is much more versatile.

By using intervals and morphology of QRS, QTc and T waves we can glean insight into severe electrolyte disturbance, including hypo- or hyperkalemia and hypo- or hypernatremia. Both of these are significant concerns in sports medicine, and it makes sense that we would have the same issues in heat-stressed responders.

One of the steps in risk stratifying patients who have chest pain in the hospital is to subject them to a stress test. This involves exercising or stressing the heart to ensure its ability to maintain adequate perfusion and oxygenation during high demand periods.

Any degree of active or even passive firefighting involves the release of adrenaline and generation and sometimes impaired loss of heat, as well as significant exertion, which all equate to stress on the heart.

Firefighters are at a higher than average risk for heart disease and sudden death than the general population. The complaint of chest pain on the fire scene should most certainly be taken seriously and prompt an appropriate evaluation, including the performance of an on-site 12-lead EKG and timely transport to the hospital for further evaluation.

Lactate levels
The measurement of point-of-care lactic acid levels is an interesting notion. We know that lactic acid is a product of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism. It is found in high levels in those who are hypoperfused, such as sepsis and shock patients [1].

This biomarker as a prehospital point-of-care test is not widely used, but it may become an important assessment tool as mobile integrated health care progresses. Its utility in rehab is uncertain.

CO exposure
Carbon monoxide and cyanide are commonly found in the air on scene of active fires. CO needs to be a concern in confined-space operations as well. Any worker with headache, nausea, vomiting, weakness or altered mental status must be considered for CO exposure.

The Rad-57 is a commonly carried oximeter that will read O2 and CO saturations. It is important to note that whether using Rad-57 for routine CO screening or COHb blood testing in the hospital, a level of CO means almost nothing without a correlating physical examination.

Any patient with symptoms consistent with CO poisoning should be placed on high-flow oxygen and transported for formal laboratory evaluation and thorough workup at the emergency department. Any fire victims or exposed responders with altered mental status should be assumed to have high CO and cyanide levels and need to be aggressively treated.

ETCO2
Carbon dioxide along with water and ATP are produced as a byproduct of cellular metabolism as our bodies consume oxygen and glucose. Following its production, CO2 is transported in the blood and is exhaled through the lungs, where it provides a convenient source to be measured. CO2 measured at the end of an exhaled breath is known as ETCO2.

Basic physiology dictates that as the body becomes more acidic, the carbonic acid buffering system balance shifts toward producing more CO2. A normal ETCO2 is between 35-45 mm Hg. Quantitative ETCO2 is directly related to cardiac perfusion, with a decrease in perfusion leading to a lower ETCO2. A patient with low cardiac output from any number of shock states does not deliver as much CO2 back from the bloodstream to the lungs to be exhaled, which subsequently results in decreased ETCO2 levels.

The use of capnography to measure ETCO2 has been gaining popularity in EMS, with applications from intubation confirmation to sepsis detection. Use of ETCO2 has long been the standard for ventillatory monitoring during anesthesia and procedural sedation.

It is not unrealistic to see ETCO2 utility in firefighter rehab as more and more ALS and BLS services use this technology on a routine basis.

In addition to the quantitative number that is generated, the capnography waveform can also be used to assist in diagnosis of the firefighter in rehab. A bronchospasm waveform is characterized by changes in the ascending phase with loss of the sharp upslope resulting in a shark fin appearance. This is due to uneven emptying of CO2 by the alveoli during exhalation. Correlated with a physical exam, this measurement can also be used to guide treatment and the response to treatment in the firefighter with bronchospasm.

Finally, when using quantitative capnography a respiratory rate is displayed, which can assist in quickly gathering and trending vital signs of firefighters who present to rehab. This saves time and resources over counting respirations, which is frequently inaccurate and time-consuming.

Use of ETCO2 can be an excellent diagnostic aid in the rehab sector of firefighting operations, but remember that diagnostic tests, regardless of their ability and value, must be interpreted in the context of the patient's clinical picture.

Conclusion
The assessment of anyone going through the rehab process should be dictated primarily by patient history, physical exam and field-proven point-of-care testing. It is unlikely that on-scene labs will be used routinely in the rehab sector unless costs decrease considerably. Pulse oximetry, EKG, ETCO2 and CO oximetry will likely continue to be the mainstays of rehab operations for some time to come.

Having formal rehab protocols, sign-in sheets, individual accountability and the support of incident commanders is crucial to rehab operations. Once in rehab, the responders become the responsibility of those running rehab.

EMS providers who are responsible for rehab operations should be familiar with local EMS protocols and NFPA 1584. In the event that a specific protocol does not cover a condition encountered on scene, medical direction should be contacted and transport initiated. We need to take a conservative approach to protecting the well-being and lives of our responders.

References

1. Hunter et al: End-tidal carbon dioxide is associated with mortality and lactate in patients with suspected sepsis. American Journal of Emergency Medicine (2013) 31, 64–71



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How I got through a well-being check

"Haven't seen him in a week," said the man who called us to his home.

Like a lot of folks in the industrial city of Providence, Rhode Island he lived on the second floor of the three level home, rented the first floor to his mom, and the third to whoever answered the ad he posted and seemed decent enough.

"Is that unusual"" I asked.

"He stays to himself mostly, but there's usually some sign of life up there, footsteps, a TV, doors closing, you know."

Yeah, I know. Wish I didn't. I wish I had some Vicks to rub under my nose.

"How old is he""

"Not too old, 50 maybe," said the man.

Fifty. Not too old. Ha ha. My own 50 years seemed to take a lifetime to reach.

We entered the rear hallway. The stairs led straight up to a landing and a door. There was a shamrock decal stuck there and greasy fingerprints around the doorknob.

"Is that smell normal," I asked the landlord who had followed us"

"He's not the cleanest tenant, but this is bad."

"Yeah, it is."

The landlord opened the door and the smell got worse. A clean stove — not because the tenant was a neatnik, rather it was seldom used. Some empty cans of canned spaghetti and balls of whatever they called meat were on a folding card table that served as his dinette. Dirty dishes spilled out of the sink and onto the counter.

The refrigerator stood in the corner inviting me to open it up. Nothing in there, not even a beer.

"Hello, anybody home"" I shouted, knowing the only answer would be my echo.

He was home alright. I could smell him.

I followed the trail to three doors in a rear hallway. Door number one, door number two or door number three. One of the doors had a string of neckties tied together, starting at the door handle and going over the top.

"Rescue 1 to Fire Alarm, start the police to this address."

"Roger Rescue 1, nature""

"Possible suicide."

I pushed the middle door. It gave a little but would not open. So I pushed a little harder.

"Here he is."

It was now a crime scene, but I needed to confirm that the man was gone. I got the door open about a foot, squeezed through and watched a dead man's weight force the door shut. He had tied the last of the neckties around his neck, strung the rest over the top of the door, tied the last to the opposite side doorknob, kneeled in front of the door, inside his bedroom, facing the back of the door and closed it.

Slowly"

Quickly"

Did he slam the door"

Did he lean into it"

I couldn't figure out the mechanics of it and realized I was spending way too much time thinking about it. Everything inside him had let go. He was bloated, stiff and dead.

Pictures of a woman and some kids had been pinned to the back of the door. I squeezed back through the doorway, pushing the body with the door.

Thankfully you can look at pictures, but they can't look back.

"Does he have any friends or family""

"He's lived here for a year, since he got out of prison. Nobody visits that I've seen."

Nobody.

The man at the end of the ties was a lot like the homeless ex-con that had been in the ambulance a few hours before we responded to this home. He was intoxicated, but able to talk. His main concern was finding work. He had no address, no references, no money and no past to put on an application. He had been staying at a shelter, waiting for a break. He seemed like a nice enough guy so I told him about a place my brother, a correctional officer told me about, a place that gave ex-cons a chance.

It is difficult to not judge the people that we meet during our shift. As years in EMS add up, and similar experiences begin to appear the same and the people who make up those experiences say the same things, have the same complaints and even look the same, our empathy can fade. For some EMS providers it takes years while others lose it rather quickly. Then there are those who keep it together for their entire career.

Instead of dwelling on the man who gave up, I was able to focus on the one who looked like a living version of the dead guy, who now had a business name for an apartment and an address in his top pocket. I didn't know it when I handed the note to him, but the look of gratitude on his face would get me through a difficult call, and the rest of the shift.



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Assessment of physicians' knowledge in transfusion medicine in eastern part of Turkey

2016-10-31T07-16-56Z
Source: Medicine Science | International Medical Journal
Ali Fettah, Duygu Kara, Gökçe Pınar Reis, Alev Cansu Certel, Soner Sertan Kara.
Transfusion of blood and blood components is one of the most common medical procedures in the developed world. Knowledge of physicians about blood transfusion is the most important determinant of their approach towards blood transfusion. In this study, we aimed to assess clinicians' basic knowledge regarding transfusion medicine through a questionnaire in a regional hospital. One hundred and one physicians including general practitioners, resident physicians, and specialists participated in the study. The participants were tested with a questionnaire consisting of 20 questions about transfusion medicine. Their scores were compared with regard to their departments, age and experience in medicine. The mean age of study population was 33.1±6 years. Of the total, 70 (69.3%) were male and the average year in medical practice was 7.3±5.8 years. Overall, 52% of the questions were correctly answered. The proportion of correct answers to the questions about basic knowledge, clinical use of blood, and transfusion reactions were as; 52.7%, 54.7%, and 47.3%, respectively. Thirty-four (33.7%) participants scored higher than 60 points, out of 100 points. The average score of total knowledge of participants about transfusion medicine was 52±10. The total knowledge scores of groups including internal departments, surgical departments, and emergency medicine were 55.7±10.2, 51.5±8.3, and 46±10.3, respectively and the differences between three groups were significant (p=0.001) . Also, a positive correlation has been shown between age, experience in medicine and total awareness score in transfusion medicine. The study yielded low/moderate levels of knowledge about transfusion medicine and it was concluded that additional education in transfusion medicine is necessary in all specialties and at each phases of medical practice.


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Relationship between thyrotropin and BMI in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism

2016-10-31T04-18-55Z
Source: Medicine Science | International Medical Journal
Manuel Iván Hernández-Estala, Ana Marlend Rivas-Gómez, Gabriela María Loya-Gómez, Eliseo López-Hernández.
Subclinical hypothyroidism is an asymptomatic illness characterized by elevated serum thyrotropin and normal values of thyroid hormones. Currently, epidemiological studies have suggested a positive relationship between serum thyrotropin and body mass index, although the primary source of this relationship is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether serum thyrotropin concentrations are associated with body mass index in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism. This is an observational, cross-sectional and analytical study, carried out in the Mexican Social Security Institutes General Hospital No. 1 in Chihuahua. Weight, height, concentrations of serum thyrotropin, age, sex and smoking status data were collected from the clinical records of 128 patients diagnosed with subclinical hypothyroidism. We found that in higher categories of BMI we found higher means of serum thyrotropin: 5.92 μIU/mL for normal BMIs, 6.14 μIU/mL for overweight, 6.41 μIU/mL for obesity class I, and 7.03 μIU/mL for obesity classes II and II, P for trend


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RESPONSE OF BROILER CHICKEN TO PARBOILED MANGO SEED KERNEL MEAL (PMKM) BASED DIET FORTIFIED WITH VITAMINS

2016-10-31T03-04-29Z
Source: International Journal of Livestock Research
Rafiu T Adewale, Odunsi A Adeyinka, Akinwumi O Akinyinka, Olakanlo O Damilola, Anwo O Joseph.
This study was carried out to investigate effect of vitamins supplementation of PMKM based diet on performance, organ and carcass properties of broiler birds. Five diets (T1; the control, T3-T5 contained 20% PMKM and vitamin(s) C &/or E) were formulated and 150 birds were used for the experiment. Feed and water were supplied ad-libitum. Weekly weight was monitored, while organs and carcass cut parts were obtained and evaluated at eight weeks. Final weight, average daily weight gain and feed conversion ratio (FCR) of control was significantly better than PMKM based diets, likewise breast meat (17.18). Highest proportion (p


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Visceral to subcutaneous fat ratio predicts acuity of diverticulitis

Surgical Endoscopy

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Network meta-analysis of first- and second-generation protease inhibitors for chronic hepatitis C genotype 1: efficacy based on RVR and SVR 24

European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

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All-oral direct-acting antiviral therapy in HCV-advanced liver disease is effective in real-world practice: Observations through HCV-TARGET database

Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics

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Cancer Survivor Study (CASUS) on colorectal patients: Longitudinal study on physical activity, fitness, nutrition, and its influences on quality of life, disease recurrence, and survival. Rationale and design

International Journal of Colorectal Disease

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Preoperative glycosylated hemoglobin levels predict anastomotic leak after esophagectomy with cervical esophagogastric anastomosis

World Journal of Surgery

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Impact of IFNL4 rs12979860 and rs8099917 polymorphisms on response to Peg-Interferon- and Ribavirin in patients with congenital bleeding disorder and chronic hepatitis C

Journal of Clinical Laboratory Analysis

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Early detection of nonperitoneal recurrence may contribute to survival benefit after curative gastrectomy for gastric cancer

Gastric Cancer

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Treatment of hepatitis E virus

Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases

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Rates of secondary hyperparathyroidism after bypass operation for super-morbid obesity: An overlooked phenomenon

Surgery

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Magnetic resonance elastography vs transient elastography in detection of fibrosis and noninvasive measurement of steatosis in patients with biopsy-proven nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Gastroenterology

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Over 1 million treated with highly effective hepatitis C medicines

WHO news

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Strain elastography for assessment of liver fibrosis and prognosis in patients with chronic liver diseases

Journal of Gastroenterology

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The impact of irritable bowel syndrome on daily functioning: Characterizing and understanding daily consequences of IBS

Neurogastroenterology & Motility

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Elevated serum carcinoembryonic antigen is associated with a worse survival outcome of patients after liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma: A propensity score matching analysis

Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery

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Robotic versus laparoscopic left lateral sectionectomy of liver

Surgical Endoscopy

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Addition of Lubiprostone to polyethylene glycol(PEG) enhances the quality & efficacy of colonoscopy preparation: A randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial

BMC Gastroenterology

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Neoadjuvant therapy versus upfront surgery for resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma: A nationwide propensity score matched analysis

Surgery

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Risk factors for postoperative delirium after colorectal operation

Surgery

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Do hospital factors impact readmissions and mortality after colorectal resections at minority-serving hospitals?

Surgery

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Preoperative chemoradiotherapy might improve the prognosis of patients with locally advanced low rectal cancer and lateral pelvic lymph node metastases

World Journal of Surgery

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A network-biology perspective of microRNA function and dysfunction in cancer

Nature Reviews Genetics. doi:10.1038/nrg.2016.134

Authors: Cameron P. Bracken, Hamish S. Scott & Gregory J. Goodall



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Non-coding RNA: Deciphering the rules of microRNA targeting

Nature Reviews Genetics. doi:10.1038/nrg.2016.148

Author: Ross Cloney



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Loss-of-function genetic tools for animal models: cross-species and cross-platform differences

Nature Reviews Genetics. doi:10.1038/nrg.2016.118

Authors: Benjamin E. Housden, Matthias Muhar, Matthew Gemberling, Charles A. Gersbach, Didier Y. R. Stainier, Geraldine Seydoux, Stephanie E. Mohr, Johannes Zuber & Norbert Perrimon



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Organization and function of the 3D genome

Nature Reviews Genetics. doi:10.1038/nrg.2016.147

Author: Boyan Bonev & Giacomo Cavalli



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Genomics: Mapping meiotic breaks

Nature Reviews Genetics. doi:10.1038/nrg.2016.146

Author: Ross Cloney



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